Comments on: Diversify, Diversify, Diversify http://sharonastyk.com/2007/08/28/diversify-diversify-diversify/ Sharon Astyk's Ruminations on an Ambiguous Future Wed, 19 Nov 2008 20:44:12 +0000 #?v=2.3.2 By: Anonymous http://sharonastyk.com/2007/08/28/diversify-diversify-diversify/#comment-2321 Anonymous Thu, 30 Aug 2007 08:24:00 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2007/08/28/diversify-diversify-diversify/#comment-2321 Ta muchly.<br/><br/>cheers<br/><br/>Luke Ta muchly.

cheers

Luke

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By: Melson http://sharonastyk.com/2007/08/28/diversify-diversify-diversify/#comment-2320 Melson Wed, 29 Aug 2007 15:12:00 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2007/08/28/diversify-diversify-diversify/#comment-2320 This quote from Cormac McCarthy's apocalyptic novel <i>The Road</i> nicely sums up the feeling of what you're talking about in your first two paragraphs:<br/><br/>"He could not construct for the child's pleasure the world he'd lost without constructing the loss as well and he thought perhaps the child had known this better than he." This quote from Cormac McCarthy’s apocalyptic novel The Road nicely sums up the feeling of what you’re talking about in your first two paragraphs:

“He could not construct for the child’s pleasure the world he’d lost without constructing the loss as well and he thought perhaps the child had known this better than he.”

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By: Future Apartment Farmers of America http://sharonastyk.com/2007/08/28/diversify-diversify-diversify/#comment-2319 Future Apartment Farmers of America Wed, 29 Aug 2007 14:56:00 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2007/08/28/diversify-diversify-diversify/#comment-2319 Re: apartment gardening<br/><br/>I have a very large south-facing window at around 43deg N lat. I have just started what I'm calling "vertically farming my living room."<br/><br/>I selected plants that allegedly grow well in pots and installed some metal shelves directly in front of the window. So far, I have some lettuce sprouting, but I'm hoping that the beets will do well. Bush beans, peas, tomatoes, bush cucumbers and peppers are the experimental pots (I expect at best half will survive and I'll keep notes on what does).<br/><br/>I've got a florescent "grow light" tube in reserve as well as the incandescent fixture from two old fish tanks in case I have to give supplemental light in the winter (I'm hoping to avoid this, but if I can come up with some clever system by which I can turn those on on a timer and NOT use the overhead lighting in the living room, I'll feel like that's an acceptable energy trade-off).<br/><br/>Wish me luck! Re: apartment gardening

I have a very large south-facing window at around 43deg N lat. I have just started what I’m calling “vertically farming my living room.”

I selected plants that allegedly grow well in pots and installed some metal shelves directly in front of the window. So far, I have some lettuce sprouting, but I’m hoping that the beets will do well. Bush beans, peas, tomatoes, bush cucumbers and peppers are the experimental pots (I expect at best half will survive and I’ll keep notes on what does).

I’ve got a florescent “grow light” tube in reserve as well as the incandescent fixture from two old fish tanks in case I have to give supplemental light in the winter (I’m hoping to avoid this, but if I can come up with some clever system by which I can turn those on on a timer and NOT use the overhead lighting in the living room, I’ll feel like that’s an acceptable energy trade-off).

Wish me luck!

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By: Kiashu http://sharonastyk.com/2007/08/28/diversify-diversify-diversify/#comment-2318 Kiashu Wed, 29 Aug 2007 03:16:00 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2007/08/28/diversify-diversify-diversify/#comment-2318 rebekka, some apartments have balconies or for the ground floor ones, small strips just outside the window. Some have walkways. These spaces can have a few containers which will brighten up the place if nothing else.<br/><br/>And everyone has windows, something on the inside windowsill can be nice. Bathrooms with good skylights or windows can have ferns. Obviously you're not gong to feed yourself out of those things, but a few plants can be cheering. rebekka, some apartments have balconies or for the ground floor ones, small strips just outside the window. Some have walkways. These spaces can have a few containers which will brighten up the place if nothing else.

And everyone has windows, something on the inside windowsill can be nice. Bathrooms with good skylights or windows can have ferns. Obviously you’re not gong to feed yourself out of those things, but a few plants can be cheering.

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By: Rebekka http://sharonastyk.com/2007/08/28/diversify-diversify-diversify/#comment-2317 Rebekka Wed, 29 Aug 2007 00:13:00 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2007/08/28/diversify-diversify-diversify/#comment-2317 Hi Sharon, I've been wondering for a while - and particularly after reading the post you linked back to the other day on what your friend with the average-sized block should do - what we can do if we're in an apartment? We actually have a small courtyard garden, but I'm sure there are others in apartments too who would appreciate some suggestions? Hi Sharon, I’ve been wondering for a while - and particularly after reading the post you linked back to the other day on what your friend with the average-sized block should do - what we can do if we’re in an apartment? We actually have a small courtyard garden, but I’m sure there are others in apartments too who would appreciate some suggestions?

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By: Els http://sharonastyk.com/2007/08/28/diversify-diversify-diversify/#comment-2315 Els Tue, 28 Aug 2007 19:44:00 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2007/08/28/diversify-diversify-diversify/#comment-2315 (I have read and heard they are going to shoot a remake of Soylent Green.)<br/><br/>About a week ago, me and my husband attended Reef Fest Curaçao (we live on Curaçao). It was a small educational festival to raise awareness of reefs and corals among local teachers, who often can't even swim. Curaçao is surrounded by the most beautiful diversity of corals, plants and fish, but its glorious beauty is slowly fading because of pollution. (the teachers didn't know that either...)<br/>A US professor (don't remember his name) showed the teacher the meaning of 'environment' through a very simple game and it was this game that came to mind when I read your post about diversity. I'll try to explain the game and maybe you can use it...<br/><br/>About twenty people make a circle. Everyone gets to be a certain species (in our case, it was all reef and underwater life, from plankton and anemones to sharks to crabs, etc.). Somebody also played the sun. <br/>Now the professor stood in the middle of the circle with a very long piece of string. He gave the sun one end and asked her: "Who do you 'feed'? Who grows on you?" She answered: "algae" and the professor connected her string to the man who played algae. From him, the string went on and on via all sorts of species, including bacteria. Most species received the string a couple of times, for example the plankton and the bacteria, but also the smaller fish and the coral. (You were also allowed to go 'back' in the food chain: what do you grow on?) <br/><br/>In the end, a giant web was formed (it was a very long piece of string). Then the professor asked us all to pull the strings tight and to level the web, so that every string touched another. He was standing in the middle of the web and then pulled one string up. "Watch how the web shakes," he said and he let go. Indeed: the entire food chain, the entire environment, was disturbed by his one touch. Immediately everyone, even the dissatisfied woman who played a very rare species and had received the string only once, understood the meaning of this game. <br/>"Now watch what happend if I cut the string in just one place," the professor explained. "Let go of if you feel your string going loose." Within seconds, the entire web was down on the ground. The professor didn't have to explain much more... (I have read and heard they are going to shoot a remake of Soylent Green.)

About a week ago, me and my husband attended Reef Fest Curaçao (we live on Curaçao). It was a small educational festival to raise awareness of reefs and corals among local teachers, who often can’t even swim. Curaçao is surrounded by the most beautiful diversity of corals, plants and fish, but its glorious beauty is slowly fading because of pollution. (the teachers didn’t know that either…)
A US professor (don’t remember his name) showed the teacher the meaning of ‘environment’ through a very simple game and it was this game that came to mind when I read your post about diversity. I’ll try to explain the game and maybe you can use it…

About twenty people make a circle. Everyone gets to be a certain species (in our case, it was all reef and underwater life, from plankton and anemones to sharks to crabs, etc.). Somebody also played the sun.
Now the professor stood in the middle of the circle with a very long piece of string. He gave the sun one end and asked her: “Who do you ‘feed’? Who grows on you?” She answered: “algae” and the professor connected her string to the man who played algae. From him, the string went on and on via all sorts of species, including bacteria. Most species received the string a couple of times, for example the plankton and the bacteria, but also the smaller fish and the coral. (You were also allowed to go ‘back’ in the food chain: what do you grow on?)

In the end, a giant web was formed (it was a very long piece of string). Then the professor asked us all to pull the strings tight and to level the web, so that every string touched another. He was standing in the middle of the web and then pulled one string up. “Watch how the web shakes,” he said and he let go. Indeed: the entire food chain, the entire environment, was disturbed by his one touch. Immediately everyone, even the dissatisfied woman who played a very rare species and had received the string only once, understood the meaning of this game.
“Now watch what happend if I cut the string in just one place,” the professor explained. “Let go of if you feel your string going loose.” Within seconds, the entire web was down on the ground. The professor didn’t have to explain much more…

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By: Jim http://sharonastyk.com/2007/08/28/diversify-diversify-diversify/#comment-2316 Jim Tue, 28 Aug 2007 19:44:00 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2007/08/28/diversify-diversify-diversify/#comment-2316 "Whoever saves a life saves the whole world?"<br/>After all, who says humans are the only ones who count?<br/>Preach it! “Whoever saves a life saves the whole world?”
After all, who says humans are the only ones who count?
Preach it!

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By: Anonymous http://sharonastyk.com/2007/08/28/diversify-diversify-diversify/#comment-2314 Anonymous Tue, 28 Aug 2007 19:01:00 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2007/08/28/diversify-diversify-diversify/#comment-2314 I think of Solent Green quite often these days, too.... I think of Solent Green quite often these days, too….

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By: eliza http://sharonastyk.com/2007/08/28/diversify-diversify-diversify/#comment-2313 eliza Tue, 28 Aug 2007 18:45:00 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2007/08/28/diversify-diversify-diversify/#comment-2313 Good post - re seedsaving and biodiversity. VERY important. The image is coming to mind right now of the film "Solent Green" - dont know if you ever saw it? Horrible depressing film re an earth in the not-too-distant future where wildlife has basically been destroyed and they have to eat artificially-created food (in their case - it turned out to be dead people - ugh!) and the only time they saw real wildlife was on videos of way life used to be. Horrible - and it keeps coming to mind these days. It is so vital to preserve our natural heritage.<br/><br/>Cariad Good post - re seedsaving and biodiversity. VERY important. The image is coming to mind right now of the film “Solent Green” - dont know if you ever saw it? Horrible depressing film re an earth in the not-too-distant future where wildlife has basically been destroyed and they have to eat artificially-created food (in their case - it turned out to be dead people - ugh!) and the only time they saw real wildlife was on videos of way life used to be. Horrible - and it keeps coming to mind these days. It is so vital to preserve our natural heritage.

Cariad

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