Comments on: Hitting the Nail on the Head With the Hammer…of Fear http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/ Sharon Astyk's Ruminations on an Ambiguous Future Thu, 04 Dec 2008 00:41:31 +0000 #?v=2.3.2 By: Anonymous http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/#comment-3227 Anonymous Wed, 07 Nov 2007 17:17:00 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/#comment-3227 Just remembered something a solider friend of mine used to say -- when you have them by the balls, the hearts and minds will follow.<br/><br/>MEA Just remembered something a solider friend of mine used to say — when you have them by the balls, the hearts and minds will follow.

MEA

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By: Anonymous http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/#comment-3226 Anonymous Wed, 07 Nov 2007 02:05:00 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/#comment-3226 Have we forgotten about Love as a motivator? "The only thing to fear is fear itself." Fear may be a great motivator, but a society living in fear of the coming climate change/economic collapse could easily become, when things get hard, a society of people living in fear of each other.<br/><br/>I think it is important to make a conscious decision to Love.<br/><br/>It doesn't matter how hard or easy this coming transition is, one thing is certain: if we are committed to loving each other, helping each other, caring for each other, being more concerned about what we can offer to others that what we are getting for ourselves, then we have a chance of living through this thing with joy, and even abundance.<br/><br/>I also prefer Love to fear as a motivator for my own lifestyle changes. If I love Nature, and my own child, and every other human being, born and unborn, AND I am aware of how my own actions impact other living things, then I am loathe to cause any more suffering than necessary, and in fact my own joy increases the more I am able to live simply and harmoniously within the community of life.<br/><br/>Lorna Have we forgotten about Love as a motivator? “The only thing to fear is fear itself.” Fear may be a great motivator, but a society living in fear of the coming climate change/economic collapse could easily become, when things get hard, a society of people living in fear of each other.

I think it is important to make a conscious decision to Love.

It doesn’t matter how hard or easy this coming transition is, one thing is certain: if we are committed to loving each other, helping each other, caring for each other, being more concerned about what we can offer to others that what we are getting for ourselves, then we have a chance of living through this thing with joy, and even abundance.

I also prefer Love to fear as a motivator for my own lifestyle changes. If I love Nature, and my own child, and every other human being, born and unborn, AND I am aware of how my own actions impact other living things, then I am loathe to cause any more suffering than necessary, and in fact my own joy increases the more I am able to live simply and harmoniously within the community of life.

Lorna

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By: BoysMom http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/#comment-3225 BoysMom Tue, 06 Nov 2007 21:17:00 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/#comment-3225 Thanks so much you guys!<br/>The nearest town with schools and health clinics is about a hundred kilometers away by very bad road (six hours).<br/>However, the river is navigable all the way through to the big port city and its international airport, and one thing we hope to do is put in a dock and get a boat, if we can find one that would run off of biodiesel.<br/>Much of the family has gotten some education: I'd guess about half have a college degree, that's what we've been investing in the last few years, and what my inlaws have been putting every spare penny towards for the last generation. So the trained people are out there, the teachers, nurses, archetects, lawyers and all, they just aren't in the village.<br/>It looks right now (without getting a site survey done) as if solar options are probably out due to the rainy season.<br/>With a school and medical clinic and a dock, the village could become a regional center for comerce for the other villages in the area. Thanks so much you guys!
The nearest town with schools and health clinics is about a hundred kilometers away by very bad road (six hours).
However, the river is navigable all the way through to the big port city and its international airport, and one thing we hope to do is put in a dock and get a boat, if we can find one that would run off of biodiesel.
Much of the family has gotten some education: I’d guess about half have a college degree, that’s what we’ve been investing in the last few years, and what my inlaws have been putting every spare penny towards for the last generation. So the trained people are out there, the teachers, nurses, archetects, lawyers and all, they just aren’t in the village.
It looks right now (without getting a site survey done) as if solar options are probably out due to the rainy season.
With a school and medical clinic and a dock, the village could become a regional center for comerce for the other villages in the area.

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By: Wendy http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/#comment-3224 Wendy Tue, 06 Nov 2007 20:11:00 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/#comment-3224 What an awesome discussion! Here I was going to comment on how fear has motivated me to make all of these changes in my life - good changes. I stopped in the middle of typing and started reading the comments, and WOW! You guys are incredible. What a readership you have, Sharon!<br/><br/>See, <i>THIS</i> is the future I see every time I contemplate the "aftermath" of Peak Oil. I see people reaching out and touching their neighbors. <br/><br/>Sharon, please keep up the discussion. Fear is an incredibly motivating factor, and it can lead to positive change.<br/><br/>P.S. I printed out your 100 Things to Do, and am looking forward to the next 100 ;). What an awesome discussion! Here I was going to comment on how fear has motivated me to make all of these changes in my life - good changes. I stopped in the middle of typing and started reading the comments, and WOW! You guys are incredible. What a readership you have, Sharon!

See, THIS is the future I see every time I contemplate the “aftermath” of Peak Oil. I see people reaching out and touching their neighbors.

Sharon, please keep up the discussion. Fear is an incredibly motivating factor, and it can lead to positive change.

P.S. I printed out your 100 Things to Do, and am looking forward to the next 100 ;).

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By: Anonymous http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/#comment-3223 Anonymous Tue, 06 Nov 2007 18:11:00 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/#comment-3223 Boysmom,<br/><br/>That is a great project! The well is a great idea. If you want people voluntarily to move to a remote area, you need to help them obtain what they have come to view as basic services. In addition to clean water, sustainable sewage disposal, cooking, etc. [all good ideas], you might consider electricity, lighting, communications, etc. Can they put in a solar panel to run a 12V light, so the kids can read in the evening? Will they have a source of news and information? Can you get them Internet access or phone service so they can communicate with the outside world? (If they don't have TV, they're probably better off without it.)<br/><br/>Then there are services like education and health care. Is there a school? Does it teach as much as your relatives want their kids to grow up knowing? Do you need to start from scratch, put up a little building and find someone who can teach in it? If there is a local teacher, would he welcome books and educational materials? How is the local healthcare? If a kid gets severely ill or injured, how far away is the nearest clinic? Is there a road that will be passable in any season? Improving roads is controversial among environmentalists, not entirely without reason, but people who now live where they can walk to a hospital are not likely to move their kids to a place where they can't get to one in time of need.<br/><br/>Finally, how will they feed their families there? If they will farm, is land available, and do they have the skills to be successful? If they have lost those traditional skills, perhaps you can help them to rebuild that knowledge first. If they will practice skilled trades or crafts, will that work there? Will they be welcomed by the current residents? Help them to address that sort of social question too. Good luck!<br/><br/>Dewey Boysmom,

That is a great project! The well is a great idea. If you want people voluntarily to move to a remote area, you need to help them obtain what they have come to view as basic services. In addition to clean water, sustainable sewage disposal, cooking, etc. [all good ideas], you might consider electricity, lighting, communications, etc. Can they put in a solar panel to run a 12V light, so the kids can read in the evening? Will they have a source of news and information? Can you get them Internet access or phone service so they can communicate with the outside world? (If they don’t have TV, they’re probably better off without it.)

Then there are services like education and health care. Is there a school? Does it teach as much as your relatives want their kids to grow up knowing? Do you need to start from scratch, put up a little building and find someone who can teach in it? If there is a local teacher, would he welcome books and educational materials? How is the local healthcare? If a kid gets severely ill or injured, how far away is the nearest clinic? Is there a road that will be passable in any season? Improving roads is controversial among environmentalists, not entirely without reason, but people who now live where they can walk to a hospital are not likely to move their kids to a place where they can’t get to one in time of need.

Finally, how will they feed their families there? If they will farm, is land available, and do they have the skills to be successful? If they have lost those traditional skills, perhaps you can help them to rebuild that knowledge first. If they will practice skilled trades or crafts, will that work there? Will they be welcomed by the current residents? Help them to address that sort of social question too. Good luck!

Dewey

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By: jewishfarmer http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/#comment-3222 jewishfarmer Tue, 06 Nov 2007 14:54:00 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/#comment-3222 Hi MEA - I think that's a real issue. But as we've seen, fear also shapes voting patterns, and our political landscape. So it has to work in a public sense to some degree.<br/><br/>BoysMom, what a wonderful project. If you want to attract members of the younger generation back, perhaps some kind of economic project? That is, solar ovens and wells seem like a huge plus, but jobs help too - is there something artisanal that could be sold here and provide a decent living?<br/><br/>You might google Joe Bageant and email him a question. He's living part time in Belize and is working on raising the standard of living in the village he lives in.<br/><br/>Sharon Hi MEA - I think that’s a real issue. But as we’ve seen, fear also shapes voting patterns, and our political landscape. So it has to work in a public sense to some degree.

BoysMom, what a wonderful project. If you want to attract members of the younger generation back, perhaps some kind of economic project? That is, solar ovens and wells seem like a huge plus, but jobs help too - is there something artisanal that could be sold here and provide a decent living?

You might google Joe Bageant and email him a question. He’s living part time in Belize and is working on raising the standard of living in the village he lives in.

Sharon

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By: Alan http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/#comment-3221 Alan Tue, 06 Nov 2007 04:15:00 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/#comment-3221 Boysmom,<br/>Here's a link to an outfit called Trees, Water & People which promotes a simple, very efficient wood cookstove:<br/><br/>http://tinyurl.com/37ascd<br/><br/>And here's a link to the Solar Oven Society which has a program to introduce solar ovens in developing countries:<br/><br/>http://www.solarovens.org/index.html<br/><br/>I would contact these organizations directly to see about getting their information in French (or any other language). Boysmom,
Here’s a link to an outfit called Trees, Water & People which promotes a simple, very efficient wood cookstove:

http://tinyurl.com/37ascd

And here’s a link to the Solar Oven Society which has a program to introduce solar ovens in developing countries:

http://www.solarovens.org/index.html

I would contact these organizations directly to see about getting their information in French (or any other language).

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By: Anonymous http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/#comment-3220 Anonymous Tue, 06 Nov 2007 03:44:00 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/#comment-3220 "Particularly any that would have instructions, such as for the solar oven, in French?"<br/><br/>Not sure how well different designs work, but just googling "four solaire" or "four solaire construire" yields lots of different plans. “Particularly any that would have instructions, such as for the solar oven, in French?”

Not sure how well different designs work, but just googling “four solaire” or “four solaire construire” yields lots of different plans.

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By: Anonymous http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/#comment-3219 Anonymous Tue, 06 Nov 2007 01:19:00 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/#comment-3219 Boysmom, solar ovens work well (see: www.solarovens.org/)<br/><br/>We used one exclusively for a week in the aftermath of hurricane Wilma in FL when we had no electricity. We also used a hand pump to get water from our well. Everyone around us was using gas generators (loud and smelly!), while we did well with our sustainable equipment.<br/><br/>~Vegan/Leaving FL Boysmom, solar ovens work well (see: http://www.solarovens.org/)

We used one exclusively for a week in the aftermath of hurricane Wilma in FL when we had no electricity. We also used a hand pump to get water from our well. Everyone around us was using gas generators (loud and smelly!), while we did well with our sustainable equipment.

~Vegan/Leaving FL

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By: BoysMom http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/#comment-3218 BoysMom Tue, 06 Nov 2007 01:03:00 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2007/11/05/hitting-the-nail-on-the-head-with-the-hammerof-fear/#comment-3218 Oh, they've got trees, Alan, and I suspect my uncle-in-law would cuss me out if I suggested he plant more! It's almost all (thousands of acres) jungle. Trees are more part of the problem at this point: it's a lot of backbreaking labor to keep them out of the fields, only about .02% of the total. The tribe practices a sort of crop rotation: the land is cleared and farmed for a few years, then left to return to jungle for a generation. We did have an arguement a couple years back with some relatives who wanted to clearcut so as to get some quick cash, but our side won, in part because all those who still live on the land did not want it cut.<br/><br/>Alan, do you have any links to those groups? Particularly any that would have instructions, such as for the solar oven, in French? We talked at one point with WWF . . . what we are trying to do isn't quite in their line.<br/><br/>Amelia, thanks for the link. The hydro power and the water purification are particularly interesting in this situation and we will be going over them carefully. The biodigester offers an option for dealing with sewage rather than letting it back into the river. Oh, they’ve got trees, Alan, and I suspect my uncle-in-law would cuss me out if I suggested he plant more! It’s almost all (thousands of acres) jungle. Trees are more part of the problem at this point: it’s a lot of backbreaking labor to keep them out of the fields, only about .02% of the total. The tribe practices a sort of crop rotation: the land is cleared and farmed for a few years, then left to return to jungle for a generation. We did have an arguement a couple years back with some relatives who wanted to clearcut so as to get some quick cash, but our side won, in part because all those who still live on the land did not want it cut.

Alan, do you have any links to those groups? Particularly any that would have instructions, such as for the solar oven, in French? We talked at one point with WWF . . . what we are trying to do isn’t quite in their line.

Amelia, thanks for the link. The hydro power and the water purification are particularly interesting in this situation and we will be going over them carefully. The biodigester offers an option for dealing with sewage rather than letting it back into the river.

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