Comments on: Storing Seeds http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/19/storing-seeds/ Sharon Astyk's Ruminations on an Ambiguous Future Wed, 03 Dec 2008 23:41:49 +0000 #?v=2.3.2 By: Chris http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/19/storing-seeds/#comment-6916 Chris Sun, 22 Jun 2008 17:31:04 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/19/storing-seeds/#comment-6916 "...gang aft agley" Anytime I say this no one knows what I'm talking about. What a wealth of advice leavened with the random zingers. Thanks Sharon. “…gang aft agley”

Anytime I say this no one knows what I’m talking about. What a wealth of advice leavened with the random zingers. Thanks Sharon.

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By: Anonymous http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/19/storing-seeds/#comment-3887 Anonymous Wed, 26 Mar 2008 14:54:54 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/19/storing-seeds/#comment-3887 Thanks for the tips! Thanks for the tips!

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By: Idaho Locavore http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/19/storing-seeds/#comment-3817 Idaho Locavore Sat, 22 Mar 2008 17:17:52 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/19/storing-seeds/#comment-3817 One thing you can try - and we plan to try this, this year here - is to grow your potatoes from start to finish under a very light polyester row cover. Most potato viruses are spread by insects, so the less access they have to the plants, the longer your seedstock *may* last. It's dicey, but spunbonded polyester row covers are not very expensive, and can be reused, with care, for a couple or three seasons or so. So I think it's worth a try, at least. Potatoes don't need to be pollinated to bear their crop, so you won't be losing anything but some potential seed pods. And if you want to try potatoes from seed, it's actually much better to do the pollination yourself by hand rather than trust to the vagaries of nature, especially if you have more than one variety growing. In fact, if you plan to save most any kind of seed, some spunbonded row cover is a wonderful tool to have around. It's good for building isolation cages for crops you don't want to risk having crossed. Isolation cages won't help out for all types of veggies, but for those that tend to want to cross rampantly with any nearby relative, they can greatly increase your chance of producing fairly pure seed. One thing you can try - and we plan to try this, this year here - is to grow your potatoes from start to finish under a very light polyester row cover. Most potato viruses are spread by insects, so the less access they have to the plants, the longer your seedstock *may* last. It’s dicey, but spunbonded polyester row covers are not very expensive, and can be reused, with care, for a couple or three seasons or so. So I think it’s worth a try, at least. Potatoes don’t need to be pollinated to bear their crop, so you won’t be losing anything but some potential seed pods. And if you want to try potatoes from seed, it’s actually much better to do the pollination yourself by hand rather than trust to the vagaries of nature, especially if you have more than one variety growing.

In fact, if you plan to save most any kind of seed, some spunbonded row cover is a wonderful tool to have around. It’s good for building isolation cages for crops you don’t want to risk having crossed. Isolation cages won’t help out for all types of veggies, but for those that tend to want to cross rampantly with any nearby relative, they can greatly increase your chance of producing fairly pure seed.

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By: Greenpa http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/19/storing-seeds/#comment-3815 Greenpa Sat, 22 Mar 2008 13:22:57 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/19/storing-seeds/#comment-3815 In my experience (and that's limited to - my own experiences!) - it's a "moderate" concern. If your soil is exactly wrong, though, and you have to plant in the same piece repeatedly, it's a BIG deal. If you have enough garden space that you can rotate where you put solanaceae- so that you don't use the same ground without a full year at least "off" - and 2 years is better- then often you could "get away" with using your own potatoes, mostly by choosing only those that are flawless for seed. The consequences of being mistaken though can be a near total crop failure, which can be very painful. In my experience (and that’s limited to - my own experiences!) - it’s a “moderate” concern. If your soil is exactly wrong, though, and you have to plant in the same piece repeatedly, it’s a BIG deal. If you have enough garden space that you can rotate where you put solanaceae- so that you don’t use the same ground without a full year at least “off” - and 2 years is better- then often you could “get away” with using your own potatoes, mostly by choosing only those that are flawless for seed.

The consequences of being mistaken though can be a near total crop failure, which can be very painful.

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By: Anonymous http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/19/storing-seeds/#comment-3808 Anonymous Fri, 21 Mar 2008 22:09:48 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/19/storing-seeds/#comment-3808 What about potatoes. I keep reading things that say don't save your potatoes for planting -- that in order to avoid disease you have to buy seed potatoes. How much of an issue is this? What about potatoes. I keep reading things that say don’t save your potatoes for planting — that in order to avoid disease you have to buy seed potatoes. How much of an issue is this?

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