Comments on: Food Storage With Pregnant Women, Infants and Young Children http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/25/food-storage-with-pregnant-women-infants-and-young-children/ Sharon Astyk's Ruminations on an Ambiguous Future Sun, 10 May 2009 05:03:21 +0000 #?v=2.3.2 By: Malin http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/25/food-storage-with-pregnant-women-infants-and-young-children/#comment-3940 Malin Thu, 27 Mar 2008 21:22:44 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/25/food-storage-with-pregnant-women-infants-and-young-children/#comment-3940 I hardly felt any nausea thanks a lot of snacking and my mama tea and maybe my genes, who knows. I can recommend the pregnancy tea during the whole pregnancy: raspberry leaves and nettles mostly, with spearmint for taste and little less of other good herbs as chamomille, rosehips, oatstraw. There are also good herbs for nursing, as blessed thislte, anise and fennel. Cramp Bark relieves the pain of uterine contractions after birth and during menstrual flow. Blue Cohosh helps the uterus return to its pre-pregnancy state. Hops are a sleep inducing, milk-producing painkiller. Wise Woman Herbal for the Childbearing Year by Susun Weed is a great herb book! Many herbs are growing around us so if we learn about and gather them ourselves at the right time, we are not dependent on buying herbs - though try to learn from someone who can show you how the plants look like etc. I hardly felt any nausea thanks a lot of snacking and my mama tea and maybe my genes, who knows. I can recommend the pregnancy tea during the whole pregnancy: raspberry leaves and nettles mostly, with spearmint for taste and little less of other good herbs as chamomille, rosehips, oatstraw. There are also good herbs for nursing, as blessed thislte, anise and fennel. Cramp Bark relieves the pain of uterine contractions after birth and during menstrual flow. Blue Cohosh helps the uterus return to its pre-pregnancy state. Hops are a sleep inducing, milk-producing painkiller.

Wise Woman Herbal for the Childbearing Year by Susun Weed is a great herb book! Many herbs are growing around us so if we learn about and gather them ourselves at the right time, we are not dependent on buying herbs - though try to learn from someone who can show you how the plants look like etc.

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By: Sharon http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/25/food-storage-with-pregnant-women-infants-and-young-children/#comment-3885 Sharon Wed, 26 Mar 2008 12:40:48 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/25/food-storage-with-pregnant-women-infants-and-young-children/#comment-3885 Kathy - Thank you for the information - I had no idea! I really appreciate it. Lise - Yay for cabbage and ketchup (although don't make me eat it ;-)! IL - Thanks for the tip on drying mint - I'll definitely try it. And it is definitely worth having any pregnant women try everything - morning sickness sucks. Sharon Kathy - Thank you for the information - I had no idea! I really appreciate it.

Lise - Yay for cabbage and ketchup (although don’t make me eat it ;-)!

IL - Thanks for the tip on drying mint - I’ll definitely try it. And it is definitely worth having any pregnant women try everything - morning sickness sucks.

Sharon

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By: Kathy http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/25/food-storage-with-pregnant-women-infants-and-young-children/#comment-3878 Kathy Wed, 26 Mar 2008 08:06:58 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/25/food-storage-with-pregnant-women-infants-and-young-children/#comment-3878 Hi Sharon, I don't think I've ever commented here before, although I have been an interested reader for some time now. This post is great; the only very small caveat I'd interject, as a person with a genetic food allergy auto-immune disorder (Coeliac disease) is that if you or your partner does have Coeliac, it is actually important to introduce gluten-containing foods earlier rather than later - the medicos recommend at 4 months, and certainly no later than 6 months. It sounds so counter-intuitive but apparently the earlier introduction of gluten can delay or avoid the development of Coeliac disease. There's a recent study on it: http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/293/19/2343 And believe me - Coeliac is enough of a bugger to manage in an option-rich Western nation now - it will be even less fun in times of shortage. If it's possible to avoid its onset in children at risk (with a parent diagnosed), that is a good goal to have. So, unlike for other food allergies - Coeliac parents should introduce gluten containing solids to babies post 4 months but well before 6 months. Hi Sharon,

I don’t think I’ve ever commented here before, although I have been an interested reader for some time now. This post is great; the only very small caveat I’d interject, as a person with a genetic food allergy auto-immune disorder (Coeliac disease) is that if you or your partner does have Coeliac, it is actually important to introduce gluten-containing foods earlier rather than later - the medicos recommend at 4 months, and certainly no later than 6 months. It sounds so counter-intuitive but apparently the earlier introduction of gluten can delay or avoid the development of Coeliac disease. There’s a recent study on it: http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/293/19/2343

And believe me - Coeliac is enough of a bugger to manage in an option-rich Western nation now - it will be even less fun in times of shortage. If it’s possible to avoid its onset in children at risk (with a parent diagnosed), that is a good goal to have.

So, unlike for other food allergies - Coeliac parents should introduce gluten containing solids to babies post 4 months but well before 6 months.

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By: Lise http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/25/food-storage-with-pregnant-women-infants-and-young-children/#comment-3865 Lise Tue, 25 Mar 2008 21:05:18 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/25/food-storage-with-pregnant-women-infants-and-young-children/#comment-3865 Sharon, I just went back and read your post on picky eating--wow!! It's a great one. The kids in my early childhood program get all kinds of "weird" foods from me, with a very similar attitude. You give me the courage to be even more hardline! (and, p.s., they were begging me for more cabbage and ketchup today!) :-) Lise Sharon,

I just went back and read your post on picky eating–wow!! It’s a great one. The kids in my early childhood program get all kinds of “weird” foods from me, with a very similar attitude. You give me the courage to be even more hardline! (and, p.s., they were begging me for more cabbage and ketchup today!)

:-) Lise

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By: Idaho Locavore http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/25/food-storage-with-pregnant-women-infants-and-young-children/#comment-3858 Idaho Locavore Tue, 25 Mar 2008 17:16:45 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/25/food-storage-with-pregnant-women-infants-and-young-children/#comment-3858 Peppermint did wonders for me with my nausea. We also use it for garden variety tummy aches and stuffiness. Mint is super easy to grow, super easy to dehydrate and keep. Place clean but dry cut mint branches into a large paper grocery sack, staple the top mostly shut and put in a very warm dry place (I keep mine in the summer sunroom) for a few days until the leaves are crispy dry. Strip leaves from the dried twigs and pack into a large glass jar. Keep in a cool, dark cupboard. This keeps the volatile oils in the mint better than any other method I've used. Peppermint did wonders for me with my nausea. We also use it for garden variety tummy aches and stuffiness. Mint is super easy to grow, super easy to dehydrate and keep. Place clean but dry cut mint branches into a large paper grocery sack, staple the top mostly shut and put in a very warm dry place (I keep mine in the summer sunroom) for a few days until the leaves are crispy dry. Strip leaves from the dried twigs and pack into a large glass jar. Keep in a cool, dark cupboard. This keeps the volatile oils in the mint better than any other method I’ve used.

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