Comments on: The Chicken Pax http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/ Sharon Astyk's Ruminations on an Ambiguous Future Thu, 20 Nov 2008 00:05:53 +0000 #?v=2.3.2 By: Sandra Mort http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/#comment-12803 Sandra Mort Mon, 03 Nov 2008 14:26:31 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/#comment-12803 I was pointed to your blog by someone who thought you might be able to suggest a local shochet. I live in Saugerties, NY. Thank you! I was pointed to your blog by someone who thought you might be able to suggest a local shochet. I live in Saugerties, NY.

Thank you!

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By: Green Hill Farm http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/#comment-4251 Green Hill Farm Mon, 07 Apr 2008 00:37:56 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/#comment-4251 I've had chickens for 10 years you think regular chicken pax is bad don't buy an incubator, maybe one of the most fun things ever :). I have a few eggs in bator now I only expect 3+ to hatch had quite a few clears don't think the roos are performing or more likely the girls who are older and some bigger don't like them :). A link to some pic see the chick Tiara on page one grown on page two I have one of her eggs in bator and its developing, I think it going to be half bantam that should be cute :). http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v246/bethhook/?start=0 Beth in Massachusetts if you live near come visit :). I’ve had chickens for 10 years you think regular chicken pax is bad don’t buy an incubator, maybe one of the most fun things ever :).

I have a few eggs in bator now I only expect 3+ to hatch had quite a few clears don’t think the roos are performing or more likely the girls who are older and some bigger don’t like them :).

A link to some pic see the chick Tiara on page one grown on page two I have one of her eggs in bator and its developing, I think it going to be half bantam that should be cute :).

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v246/bethhook/?start=0

Beth in Massachusetts if you live near come visit :).

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By: Sharon http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/#comment-4238 Sharon Sun, 06 Apr 2008 13:34:02 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/#comment-4238 I think that maybe the difference on the low fence may be our over-herding dogs. The chickens are *happier* behind the fence than with the dogs herding them into the barn endlessly ;-). Re: livestock - right now we have chickens, ducks, angora bunnies, cats and the dogs. We had turkeys last year, and will have them again this year, and this year I plan to keep them over. I too have been contemplating Guineas, because of the tick situation. And we used to have geese - and I'm debating pilgrim geese. Oh, and bees. The goats come in July, and my friend Elaine is talking about pasturing some of her sheep up on my pasture, and I'm thinking of at least buying a lamb to butcher at the end of the season, and maybe some older ewes.... Oh, the possibilities! Sharon I think that maybe the difference on the low fence may be our over-herding dogs. The chickens are *happier* behind the fence than with the dogs herding them into the barn endlessly ;-).

Re: livestock - right now we have chickens, ducks, angora bunnies, cats and the dogs. We had turkeys last year, and will have them again this year, and this year I plan to keep them over. I too have been contemplating Guineas, because of the tick situation. And we used to have geese - and I’m debating pilgrim geese. Oh, and bees.

The goats come in July, and my friend Elaine is talking about pasturing some of her sheep up on my pasture, and I’m thinking of at least buying a lamb to butcher at the end of the season, and maybe some older ewes….

Oh, the possibilities!

Sharon

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By: Jamey http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/#comment-4228 Jamey Sat, 05 Apr 2008 14:13:56 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/#comment-4228 @Amy The rule of thumb on "all-pasture" for livestock is 2000 lbs per pasture. So, one cow and her calf, one horse, 4-500 pullets, etc. Our Nigies top out around 100 lbs (buck) and 70-80 lbs (doe), so you should be able to rotate about 20 during the growing season. Rotate here means portable electric fencing to confine them. Outside of the growing season, you have to give them hay during the season(s) when the grass isn't growing. Up here in upstate NY, we have them on pasture from mid-April to Halloween. That being said, they are wonderful - we have about 3 acres for them and the noises are pretty low key. Except at breakfast time :D @Amy The rule of thumb on “all-pasture” for livestock is 2000 lbs per pasture. So, one cow and her calf, one horse, 4-500 pullets, etc. Our Nigies top out around 100 lbs (buck) and 70-80 lbs (doe), so you should be able to rotate about 20 during the growing season. Rotate here means portable electric fencing to confine them.

Outside of the growing season, you have to give them hay during the season(s) when the grass isn’t growing. Up here in upstate NY, we have them on pasture from mid-April to Halloween.

That being said, they are wonderful - we have about 3 acres for them and the noises are pretty low key. Except at breakfast time :D

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By: Lyle http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/#comment-4226 Lyle Sat, 05 Apr 2008 00:20:48 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/#comment-4226 My father, I think, has demonstrated that you can get the Chicken Pax from yourself. Many years ago, we raised large numbers of breeders in a cage-free setting (indoors, but with free run of the different enclosed rooms in the barn). The largest number that we had at one time was about 3,500 on two floors of the barn. Not that long ago, after more than 30 years with no chickens on the farm, my father decided to start raising chickens again for local sale of the eggs. He started with 50 chickens (about 3 of which were roosters). Shortly after that, a cousin gave him six more (there is nothing quite like the sound of an adolescent rooster trying to crow). Not too long after that, he increased the numbers again so that he had 170 chickens (about 6 roosters) in two rooms of the barn -- I was involved in moving an interior wall to expand one of the rooms so that the chickens wouldn't be too crowded. That number has been reduced slightly through natural attrition. He hasn't gotten the eggs certified as organic, because the grain that he feeds them isn't certified as organic, but a number of people are happy enough that they're locally produced. I've threatened to repair one of the old chicken coops on the farm so that it can be used for the chickens again (he's been using it to store firewood), including a yard for them to scratch around in. We'll see how that goes this summer, I think. My father, I think, has demonstrated that you can get the Chicken Pax from yourself.

Many years ago, we raised large numbers of breeders in a cage-free setting (indoors, but with free run of the different enclosed rooms in the barn). The largest number that we had at one time was about 3,500 on two floors of the barn.

Not that long ago, after more than 30 years with no chickens on the farm, my father decided to start raising chickens again for local sale of the eggs. He started with 50 chickens (about 3 of which were roosters). Shortly after that, a cousin gave him six more (there is nothing quite like the sound of an adolescent rooster trying to crow). Not too long after that, he increased the numbers again so that he had 170 chickens (about 6 roosters) in two rooms of the barn — I was involved in moving an interior wall to expand one of the rooms so that the chickens wouldn’t be too crowded. That number has been reduced slightly through natural attrition.

He hasn’t gotten the eggs certified as organic, because the grain that he feeds them isn’t certified as organic, but a number of people are happy enough that they’re locally produced.

I’ve threatened to repair one of the old chicken coops on the farm so that it can be used for the chickens again (he’s been using it to store firewood), including a yard for them to scratch around in. We’ll see how that goes this summer, I think.

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By: Sara http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/#comment-4224 Sara Fri, 04 Apr 2008 22:28:22 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/#comment-4224 I would NOT keep heavies in a yard with a 3' fence, unless you want them to become your neighbors' chickens -- I have a small flock of Buff Orpingtons and they could clear that no problem. We have a 6' fence and even so I worry a bit. But yes: chickens! Eggs! Yum! (And really, Sharon, tell your relations to start buying pullets! They are not that much more money....) I would NOT keep heavies in a yard with a 3′ fence, unless you want them to become your neighbors’ chickens — I have a small flock of Buff Orpingtons and they could clear that no problem. We have a 6′ fence and even so I worry a bit.

But yes: chickens! Eggs! Yum!

(And really, Sharon, tell your relations to start buying pullets! They are not that much more money….)

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By: Rosa http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/#comment-4219 Rosa Fri, 04 Apr 2008 17:28:46 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/#comment-4219 My partner is very softhearted and is absolutely convinced that if we get chickens the neighborhood cats & squirrels would kill them all. I think if I keep working on him, eventually he'll relax - he was also sure that if we had a baby every time the kid got a bump or scrape he'd be traumatized, and he's coping fine with our rambunctious toddler so far. What I would really, really like to do is get chicks from one of the local flocks or from feral chickens out in farm country. Long time ago we had friends who were burned out of their house and moved to town, but there were still chicken escapees living and raising chicks in a hollow tree, two winters later. *Those* are useful chicken genes. And we used to have alley-neighbors whose chickens spent most days in a tree overlooking the alley. They *clearly* could have left the fenced yard but didn't, and also clearly were coping just fine with cats & other critters. Minneapolis has an interesting statute: you have to get the written permission of a certain percentage of the people who live within 200 yards of your property line at the time you apply for your chicken permit. My partner is very softhearted and is absolutely convinced that if we get chickens the neighborhood cats & squirrels would kill them all. I think if I keep working on him, eventually he’ll relax - he was also sure that if we had a baby every time the kid got a bump or scrape he’d be traumatized, and he’s coping fine with our rambunctious toddler so far.

What I would really, really like to do is get chicks from one of the local flocks or from feral chickens out in farm country. Long time ago we had friends who were burned out of their house and moved to town, but there were still chicken escapees living and raising chicks in a hollow tree, two winters later. *Those* are useful chicken genes. And we used to have alley-neighbors whose chickens spent most days in a tree overlooking the alley. They *clearly* could have left the fenced yard but didn’t, and also clearly were coping just fine with cats & other critters.

Minneapolis has an interesting statute: you have to get the written permission of a certain percentage of the people who live within 200 yards of your property line at the time you apply for your chicken permit.

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By: Crunchy Chicken http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/#comment-4217 Crunchy Chicken Fri, 04 Apr 2008 15:50:46 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/#comment-4217 meg - Mother Earth News recently ran a comparison between free-range eggs and their commercially produced counterparts: http://www.motherearthnews.com/Real-Food/2007-10-01/Tests-Reveal-Healthier-Eggs.aspx meg - Mother Earth News recently ran a comparison between free-range eggs and their commercially produced counterparts: http://www.motherearthnews.com/Real-Food/2007-10-01/Tests-Reveal-Healthier-Eggs.aspx

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By: meg http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/#comment-4216 meg Fri, 04 Apr 2008 14:08:14 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/#comment-4216 Since I started working on a farm that had chickens I have never looked back to store-bought eggs. It's amazing to me how beautiful--and diverse--eggs are. They come in so many colors--blue, greenish, brown, speckled--that it's sort of spooky going to the grocery store and seeing rows and rows of those white, uniform things they call eggs. Makes me think of Brave New World. And then the yolks of farm eggs are so much brighter. Do you know if there's any nutritional difference in factory farm eggs and real eggs? Since I started working on a farm that had chickens I have never looked back to store-bought eggs. It’s amazing to me how beautiful–and diverse–eggs are. They come in so many colors–blue, greenish, brown, speckled–that it’s sort of spooky going to the grocery store and seeing rows and rows of those white, uniform things they call eggs. Makes me think of Brave New World. And then the yolks of farm eggs are so much brighter. Do you know if there’s any nutritional difference in factory farm eggs and real eggs?

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By: rdheather http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/#comment-4215 rdheather Fri, 04 Apr 2008 13:47:37 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/04/03/the-chicken-pax/#comment-4215 I have 2 guineas(boy/girl) and sometimes they're loud. But they eat grasshoppers! And I've trained them to roost in their house at night-I've heard that owls will take them at night from trees. And for Nigerian Dwarf goats-you can't just have one-it will be lonely. But they're small-mine are knee-high, smaller than my big dog. So they look more pet like/less livestock-ish. Just make sure they come from a quiet line of goats. I thought my first two goats were noisy-then I got the screaming sisters. Wow. I have 2 guineas(boy/girl) and sometimes they’re loud. But they eat grasshoppers! And I’ve trained them to roost in their house at night-I’ve heard that owls will take them at night from trees.

And for Nigerian Dwarf goats-you can’t just have one-it will be lonely. But they’re small-mine are knee-high, smaller than my big dog. So they look more pet like/less livestock-ish. Just make sure they come from a quiet line of goats. I thought my first two goats were noisy-then I got the screaming sisters. Wow.

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