Comments on: In the Barn In Winter http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/ Sharon Astyk's Ruminations on an Ambiguous Future Thu, 11 Dec 2008 02:10:49 +0000 #?v=2.3.2 By: Kati http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/#comment-14539 Kati Wed, 10 Dec 2008 19:35:39 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/#comment-14539 *grin* It sounds like a sweet way to wile away a bit of time on a cold afternoon. I got a big chuckle out of the image of one cat chasing the chickens for a bit of exercise, and the other cat staying well out of THEIR way to avoid being chased himself. *grin* Thanks for sharing that with us, Sharon! *grin* It sounds like a sweet way to wile away a bit of time on a cold afternoon. I got a big chuckle out of the image of one cat chasing the chickens for a bit of exercise, and the other cat staying well out of THEIR way to avoid being chased himself. *grin* Thanks for sharing that with us, Sharon!

]]>
By: Laurie http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/#comment-14534 Laurie Wed, 10 Dec 2008 19:03:07 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/#comment-14534 Nice post! I recently spent some time with my chickens in their backyard coop as the sun set, twilight fell and my birds went to roost one by one. You captured the same feeling that I experienced then. The feeling of being a part of Nature and it's cycles through our relationship with our animals. The simultaneous richness and simplicity of being that our animals bring to us. And the deep gratitude that many of us feel toward the creatures we share our lives with. This is one of my favorites of your posts so far, and I've been a reader for a long time. Thank you. Nice post! I recently spent some time with my chickens in their backyard coop as the sun set, twilight fell and my birds went to roost one by one. You captured the same feeling that I experienced then. The feeling of being a part of Nature and it’s cycles through our relationship with our animals. The simultaneous richness and simplicity of being that our animals bring to us. And the deep gratitude that many of us feel toward the creatures we share our lives with. This is one of my favorites of your posts so far, and I’ve been a reader for a long time. Thank you.

]]>
By: Dave Eriqat http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/#comment-14482 Dave Eriqat Tue, 09 Dec 2008 18:57:40 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/#comment-14482 What a nice story! I wish I had a barn full of animals. Dave http://daveeriqat.wordpress.com/ What a nice story! I wish I had a barn full of animals.

Dave
http://daveeriqat.wordpress.com/

]]>
By: Laurie in MN http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/#comment-14454 Laurie in MN Tue, 09 Dec 2008 05:33:31 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/#comment-14454 Thank you for this. I have a major and strange love for goats (strange as I've never actually been around any regularly), so I always enjoy hearing about them. I asked for shares in a goat through Heifer International for Christmas this year. I should have made that my ONE request, I suppose, but I chose to make it easy on my relatives and add in some books and CDs. Or a donation to our local food shelf. *grin* We'll see what happens... Thank you for this. I have a major and strange love for goats (strange as I’ve never actually been around any regularly), so I always enjoy hearing about them.

I asked for shares in a goat through Heifer International for Christmas this year. I should have made that my ONE request, I suppose, but I chose to make it easy on my relatives and add in some books and CDs. Or a donation to our local food shelf. *grin* We’ll see what happens…

]]>
By: Veronica http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/#comment-14444 Veronica Tue, 09 Dec 2008 01:16:27 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/#comment-14444 I'm not one to comment much on blog posts, but I must say that I absolutely love this one! I can totally relate. Some of my very favorite times of the year are when its snowing. We don't have any fully enclosed barns, but we have lots of sheds (some of which we call barns!). When it begins to snow, I layer up my clothes and head out to our hay barn, where the cats congregate. There is no south wall (it used to be a shed for the goats) so I have a pretty good view out and over the river valley. The huge fields of cornstalks aren't always too pretty to look at, but grazing cattle, pastures, and trees down by the creek are nice, especially with big fat snowflakes drifting down from the sky. I'll sit down on a bale of hay and my kitty cats rush over to clamber all over me. They usually fight over my lap until they figure out that three of them can fit, and another will hop to my shoulder. Even the wild cats will come curl up near me in the hay to enjoy my company in the peace and serenity of the cold, snowy day. I'll sit out there until my toes grow so cold I can't hardly take it anymore. Disengaging myself from the cats, I head out to see the horses before going back in. They stand huddled together, either under a shed or outside with their heads down and backs turned towards the blowing snow. They lift their heads to greet me, and part to let me into their circle. I'll crouch down, and in no time at all fuzzy muzzles will be sniffing their way over my head, down my neck, into my face, and all over the rest of me. The younger ones will gently nip their lips at me, and if I'm wearing my green overalls the older ones will too. They do not get upset when the small flakes of hay on me do not magically multiply into a huge bale. They simply drop their heads again and shift so that I am in the center of their warm, cozy huddle. I’m not one to comment much on blog posts, but I must say that I absolutely love this one! I can totally relate. Some of my very favorite times of the year are when its snowing. We don’t have any fully enclosed barns, but we have lots of sheds (some of which we call barns!). When it begins to snow, I layer up my clothes and head out to our hay barn, where the cats congregate. There is no south wall (it used to be a shed for the goats) so I have a pretty good view out and over the river valley. The huge fields of cornstalks aren’t always too pretty to look at, but grazing cattle, pastures, and trees down by the creek are nice, especially with big fat snowflakes drifting down from the sky. I’ll sit down on a bale of hay and my kitty cats rush over to clamber all over me. They usually fight over my lap until they figure out that three of them can fit, and another will hop to my shoulder. Even the wild cats will come curl up near me in the hay to enjoy my company in the peace and serenity of the cold, snowy day.

I’ll sit out there until my toes grow so cold I can’t hardly take it anymore. Disengaging myself from the cats, I head out to see the horses before going back in. They stand huddled together, either under a shed or outside with their heads down and backs turned towards the blowing snow. They lift their heads to greet me, and part to let me into their circle. I’ll crouch down, and in no time at all fuzzy muzzles will be sniffing their way over my head, down my neck, into my face, and all over the rest of me. The younger ones will gently nip their lips at me, and if I’m wearing my green overalls the older ones will too. They do not get upset when the small flakes of hay on me do not magically multiply into a huge bale. They simply drop their heads again and shift so that I am in the center of their warm, cozy huddle.

]]>
By: peter in Aust http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/#comment-14435 peter in Aust Mon, 08 Dec 2008 19:28:41 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/#comment-14435 Great post! Down under where we are, we have just started our summer. Cannot wait for winter and maybe some rain. snow seems an impossible dream ...ditto a barn. We have no barn ....yet. Regards. Great post! Down under where we are, we have just started our summer. Cannot wait for winter and maybe some rain. snow seems an impossible dream …ditto a barn. We have no barn ….yet. Regards.

]]>
By: Laurie http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/#comment-14426 Laurie Mon, 08 Dec 2008 16:00:44 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/#comment-14426 Such a pleasant read this morning. I truly enjoyed it! Such a pleasant read this morning. I truly enjoyed it!

]]>
By: goinggreen http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/#comment-14425 goinggreen Mon, 08 Dec 2008 15:51:12 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/#comment-14425 Sharon, this is just beautiful. You make it sound so wonderful when in reality I know that what you are doing takes a lot of work. The beginnings of another book are taking shape here with the narrative that transitioning away from peak oil isn't so bad after all. Sharon, this is just beautiful. You make it sound so wonderful when in reality I know that what you are doing takes a lot of work. The beginnings of another book are taking shape here with the narrative that transitioning away from peak oil isn’t so bad after all.

]]>
By: Sharon http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/#comment-14424 Sharon Mon, 08 Dec 2008 15:30:11 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/#comment-14424 Kate, our bunny tractor is exactly the same as our chicken tractor - chicken wire and pvc about 5x10. It doesn't have a bottom, which I'm told that most bunnies need, but our angoras don't seem to be very serious diggers. If we're not careful and don't put it down on level ground, occasionally they escape, but they generally just hop over to us and are immediately recaptured. But if it is put flat, we don't have a problem. They make great lawn mowers, btw, but we do provide shade in the heat. I think that if we had more adventurous buns (my kids call them the very fierce bun-bun-osauruses, but they, umm...aren't), we'd need to add a mesh bottom. They love the tractor, btw, and are so much happier than in cages. And they eat a *lot* of grass - they are surprisingly good mowers for their size. Greenpa, we actually have two "barns". The first is up on our high meadow, and it is a wooden stable built (not very well) by a neighbor for the previous owners' horses. We used it for our chickens for several years, but moved them out because it is at the top of an extremely steep hill, and hauling feed and water up the steep icy hill in winter, umm, sucked. At the moment it is unused, although I think we may adapt it for the goats and move them up the hill, or expand the shared sheep operation and use them for lambing. The second is the garage that came with the house - it was built next to the old, not at all tight barn for storing hay. There's also a falling down chicken house that I swear someday we'll get fixed, and a corncrib is practically under water, being a low point of our property. We desperately need to build new drainage around the other buildings, or just take them down - obviously, we'd prefer the latter. The garage was a good sized, two bay garage, and we replaced the doors, cleaned it up and had a friend turn it into a barn. Right now it has two poultry sections (one for brooding/isolating laying birds, and a main holding area), a large goat pen, and two milking bays (one of which has the rabbit hutch). Our creatures needed a house more than our car did ;-) - I'm planning on converting one of the milking bays into a kidding area this spring. We looked at two properties with much, much better barns. The first was a house that was simply too close to neighbors that had a gorgeous 200 year old, well restored bank barn. I was almost willing to buy the house (which we didn't love) and put up with the neighbors just for the barn (and it came with a whole family of 6 toed barn cats ;-). The second was an Amish farmstead that I still mourn - Eric flat out refused to move to a place with no electricity or running water. Now he'd be fine with it, but that was then.... The barn was gorgeous, and brand new, as was all the fencing. Still, I like our garage barn a fair bit. It serves our modest purposes. My goal is to build some seperate poultry housing eventually, and probably a buck shelter as well. Sharon Kate, our bunny tractor is exactly the same as our chicken tractor - chicken wire and pvc about 5×10. It doesn’t have a bottom, which I’m told that most bunnies need, but our angoras don’t seem to be very serious diggers. If we’re not careful and don’t put it down on level ground, occasionally they escape, but they generally just hop over to us and are immediately recaptured. But if it is put flat, we don’t have a problem. They make great lawn mowers, btw, but we do provide shade in the heat. I think that if we had more adventurous buns (my kids call them the very fierce bun-bun-osauruses, but they, umm…aren’t), we’d need to add a mesh bottom. They love the tractor, btw, and are so much happier than in cages. And they eat a *lot* of grass - they are surprisingly good mowers for their size.

Greenpa, we actually have two “barns”. The first is up on our high meadow, and it is a wooden stable built (not very well) by a neighbor for the previous owners’ horses. We used it for our chickens for several years, but moved them out because it is at the top of an extremely steep hill, and hauling feed and water up the steep icy hill in winter, umm, sucked. At the moment it is unused, although I think we may adapt it for the goats and move them up the hill, or expand the shared sheep operation and use them for lambing.

The second is the garage that came with the house - it was built next to the old, not at all tight barn for storing hay. There’s also a falling down chicken house that I swear someday we’ll get fixed, and a corncrib is practically under water, being a low point of our property. We desperately need to build new drainage around the other buildings, or just take them down - obviously, we’d prefer the latter. The garage was a good sized, two bay garage, and we replaced the doors, cleaned it up and had a friend turn it into a barn. Right now it has two poultry sections (one for brooding/isolating laying birds, and a main holding area), a large goat pen, and two milking bays (one of which has the rabbit hutch). Our creatures needed a house more than our car did ;-) - I’m planning on converting one of the milking bays into a kidding area this spring.

We looked at two properties with much, much better barns. The first was a house that was simply too close to neighbors that had a gorgeous 200 year old, well restored bank barn. I was almost willing to buy the house (which we didn’t love) and put up with the neighbors just for the barn (and it came with a whole family of 6 toed barn cats ;-). The second was an Amish farmstead that I still mourn - Eric flat out refused to move to a place with no electricity or running water. Now he’d be fine with it, but that was then…. The barn was gorgeous, and brand new, as was all the fencing. Still, I like our garage barn a fair bit. It serves our modest purposes. My goal is to build some seperate poultry housing eventually, and probably a buck shelter as well.

Sharon

]]>
By: elle http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/#comment-14422 elle Mon, 08 Dec 2008 14:47:07 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2008/12/07/in-the-barn-in-winter/#comment-14422 Thanks for this. I am in the middle of reading your book and I am sick with worry and emboldened but your words. It is nice to come here and read something like this. Maybe everything can be all right. peace to you and yours, elle Thanks for this. I am in the middle of reading your book and I am sick with worry and emboldened but your words. It is nice to come here and read something like this. Maybe everything can be all right.

peace to you and yours,

elle

]]>