Comments on: Food Security as a Cottage Industry http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/ Sharon Astyk's Ruminations on an Ambiguous Future Mon, 09 Feb 2009 05:04:21 +0000 #?v=2.3.2 By: Chris http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/#comment-17027 Chris Wed, 04 Feb 2009 08:34:59 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/#comment-17027 I have just started teaching a variety of cooking classes from my home and have been astounded with the response I've received. My "So Long Supermarket, Hello Pantry" class filled up in January and is full in February, too. I teach bread & bagel making classes, yogurt & soft cheese making, making stocks, and a few others. Something we have a lot of here in Portland is "backyard farmers" who grow CSA produce on lots throughout the city. We considered having one work our side lot, but to get back to gardening it ourselves again this year. Anyway, it's a great idea for someone with farming/marketing skills but not a lot of land. I have just started teaching a variety of cooking classes from my home and have been astounded with the response I’ve received. My “So Long Supermarket, Hello Pantry” class filled up in January and is full in February, too. I teach bread & bagel making classes, yogurt & soft cheese making, making stocks, and a few others.

Something we have a lot of here in Portland is “backyard farmers” who grow CSA produce on lots throughout the city. We considered having one work our side lot, but to get back to gardening it ourselves again this year. Anyway, it’s a great idea for someone with farming/marketing skills but not a lot of land.

]]>
By: Food Security as a Cottage Industry | ¡Ya Basta! http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/#comment-17010 Food Security as a Cottage Industry | ¡Ya Basta! Tue, 03 Feb 2009 21:17:35 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/#comment-17010 [...] via: Casaubon’s Book [...] […] via: Casaubon’s Book […]

]]>
By: food security as a cottage industry | Dismantle Civilisation http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/#comment-16972 food security as a cottage industry | Dismantle Civilisation Sun, 01 Feb 2009 16:56:25 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/#comment-16972 [...] great article from Sharon Astyk. The empire is collpasing, civilisation as we know it, is coming to an end, and in this transition [...] […] great article from Sharon Astyk. The empire is collpasing, civilisation as we know it, is coming to an end, and in this transition […]

]]>
By: Rick http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/#comment-16969 Rick Sun, 01 Feb 2009 04:40:01 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/#comment-16969 We live in orchard country and the orchards take all the smaller apples and sell them in 50# bags as "Deer Apples" for just a couple of dollars. Pick the right bag and they are big enough to eat or for sauce and pies. We live in orchard country and the orchards take all the smaller apples and sell them in 50# bags as “Deer Apples” for just a couple of dollars. Pick the right bag and they are big enough to eat or for sauce and pies.

]]>
By: Mary http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/#comment-16962 Mary Sat, 31 Jan 2009 16:58:11 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/#comment-16962 A local wrestling celebrity used to give coffee away for free if you bought a cup for a nominal amount. That is how he got away with not having to comply with health department supervision. If someone routinely brought their own cup, you could sell them something else for their coffee. I have a culinary bay tree that is taking over the world and needs pruning. I haven't yet discovered where to sell on a regular basis, but I sold some to a florist once. We do need to mix it up among the classes now, I think. Thank you for this thread. A local wrestling celebrity used to give coffee away for free if you bought a cup for a nominal amount. That is how he got away with not having to comply with health department supervision. If someone routinely brought their own cup, you could sell them something else for their coffee. I have a culinary bay tree that is taking over the world and needs pruning. I haven’t yet discovered where to sell on a regular basis, but I sold some to a florist once. We do need to mix it up among the classes now, I think. Thank you for this thread.

]]>
By: Beth http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/#comment-16839 Beth Thu, 29 Jan 2009 01:17:00 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/#comment-16839 oops here is the link www.wholefarmservices.com/food_storage.shtml oops here is the link http://www.wholefarmservices.com/food_storage.shtml

]]>
By: Beth http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/#comment-16838 Beth Thu, 29 Jan 2009 01:15:54 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/#comment-16838 I think a lot about compost farming, linking up with local restaurants, collecting veggie waste. I just saw these guys on Craig's list great idea designing and/or installing root cellars. I think a lot about compost farming, linking up with local restaurants, collecting veggie waste.
I just saw these guys on Craig’s list great idea designing and/or installing root cellars.

]]>
By: The Screaming Sardine http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/#comment-16835 The Screaming Sardine Wed, 28 Jan 2009 20:00:17 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/#comment-16835 I've been thinking about making sourdough bread (thanks to Sharon's food storage class) and perhaps bartering with it. I'd also like to get a worm bin and sell the castings (after I've taken what I need). Eventually I want to get rabbits and sell their manure. I’ve been thinking about making sourdough bread (thanks to Sharon’s food storage class) and perhaps bartering with it. I’d also like to get a worm bin and sell the castings (after I’ve taken what I need). Eventually I want to get rabbits and sell their manure.

]]>
By: Sharon http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/#comment-16819 Sharon Wed, 28 Jan 2009 13:58:02 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/#comment-16819 Lots of wonderful ideas - I'm sort of putting back the garden ideas until early February, when we start a flow of garden design and small farming ideas, but these are great. Alan, I would suggest not waiting - do you know any teenagers or newly unemployed younger folks in your neighborhood? You could offer to teach them gardening and a small share of your produce in exchange for help in the garden - I know you can still do it, but the relationships might be worth it. Heck, it sounds like your gardens are spectacular enough that you should consider offering garden classes - and among the class projects could be some heavy work that needs doing ;-). ArdenLynn, that's a hard thing - I can't really blame farmers for seeking out affluent customers to make a living, but we've got to find ways to bring about affordable food to ordinary people. One of the ways we can do that is gardening in cities, and making sure that there's produce being produced on people's lots already. Can you contact your local community garden or community extension or urban food systems group and talk to them about this and find out more about your options? Where in Ohio? Maybe someone here has suggestions! Sharon Lots of wonderful ideas - I’m sort of putting back the garden ideas until early February, when we start a flow of garden design and small farming ideas, but these are great.

Alan, I would suggest not waiting - do you know any teenagers or newly unemployed younger folks in your neighborhood? You could offer to teach them gardening and a small share of your produce in exchange for help in the garden - I know you can still do it, but the relationships might be worth it. Heck, it sounds like your gardens are spectacular enough that you should consider offering garden classes - and among the class projects could be some heavy work that needs doing ;-).

ArdenLynn, that’s a hard thing - I can’t really blame farmers for seeking out affluent customers to make a living, but we’ve got to find ways to bring about affordable food to ordinary people. One of the ways we can do that is gardening in cities, and making sure that there’s produce being produced on people’s lots already. Can you contact your local community garden or community extension or urban food systems group and talk to them about this and find out more about your options? Where in Ohio? Maybe someone here has suggestions!

Sharon

]]>
By: ArdenLynn http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/#comment-16816 ArdenLynn Wed, 28 Jan 2009 13:10:31 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/food-security-as-a-cottage-industry/#comment-16816 I am always a bit confused with the advice to "find your local farmer". Or "find your local farmers market". I live outside a large city in Ohio and there are no local farmers and the farmers market close to town is a boutique that is waaaay out of my price range. I guess it's good if you want to call a $6.50 jar of fruit preserves food storage. The u-pick places that are within driving distance are so expensive that the gas is prohibitive and add on the cost of the produce and you end up paying about 1.50 a pound for apples. They sell their seconds to the locals so you can't get a deal there either. I am always a bit confused with the advice to “find your local farmer”. Or “find your local farmers market”. I live outside a large city in Ohio and there are no local farmers and the farmers market close to town is a boutique that is waaaay out of my price range. I guess it’s good if you want to call a $6.50 jar of fruit preserves food storage.

The u-pick places that are within driving distance are so expensive that the gas is prohibitive and add on the cost of the produce and you end up paying about 1.50 a pound for apples. They sell their seconds to the locals so you can’t get a deal there either.

]]>