Comments on: The Dog Search http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/ Sharon Astyk's Ruminations on an Ambiguous Future Tue, 24 Nov 2009 19:15:00 -0700 #?v=2.8.4 hourly 1 By: Roger http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/comment-page-1/#comment-20800 Roger Sat, 23 May 2009 02:22:12 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/#comment-20800 We have an Akbash. Neutered male 2.5 years old 110 lbs short/medium coat. Obviously pure white. Beautiful striking athletic dog. Great powerful animal. Gentle, loyal, independent (can think on his own) and protective. Lives both indoors and out. If you get an Akbash at an early age and use proper training methods the dog will be excellent for your family and farm. They need to understand that you are the alpha in the pack, receive appropriate discipline, and receive good socialization skills and general command training. They don't fetch, they are not frisbee dogs. When you see an Akbash running at full stride you will see something special. They are very fast and very big. We are picking up a female pup from Hidden Springs Akbash next wednesday. Hidden Springs was mentioned in an earlier post regarding the Akbash This will add a second LGD to the family. There is a You Tube video of a goat farmer discussing his Akbash pack. He does a very good job summarizing his reasons for the Akbash. At the end he says, I like them because they are fast." Here is the link. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i1gZzagZuS0 Good luck We have an Akbash. Neutered male 2.5 years old 110 lbs short/medium coat. Obviously pure white. Beautiful striking athletic dog. Great powerful animal. Gentle, loyal, independent (can think on his own) and protective. Lives both indoors and out. If you get an Akbash at an early age and use proper training methods the dog will be excellent for your family and farm. They need to understand that you are the alpha in the pack, receive appropriate discipline, and receive good socialization skills and general command training. They don’t fetch, they are not frisbee dogs. When you see an Akbash running at full stride you will see something special. They are very fast and very big.

We are picking up a female pup from Hidden Springs Akbash next wednesday. Hidden Springs was mentioned in an earlier post regarding the Akbash This will add a second LGD to the family. There is a You Tube video of a goat farmer discussing his Akbash pack. He does a very good job summarizing his reasons for the Akbash. At the end he says, I like them because they are fast.” Here is the link.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i1gZzagZuS0

Good luck

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By: gen http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/comment-page-1/#comment-19606 gen Mon, 20 Apr 2009 22:29:53 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/#comment-19606 Sharon: Each breed has a rescue group specific to them. You can do a search for Great Pyr rescue, Bouvier rescue, etc. These people can tell you breed characteristics, as well as the personality of a specific dog they are fostering. You can hear firsthand how they are with children or cats or in the house, etc, etc. You will have much more information to make an informed choice. They even sometimes have mixed breeds; most have connections with shelters so that if a dog of their breed comes in, they will get called. Good luck. Gen Sharon:
Each breed has a rescue group specific to them. You can do a search for Great Pyr rescue, Bouvier rescue, etc.
These people can tell you breed characteristics, as well as the personality of a specific dog they are fostering. You can hear firsthand how they are with children or cats or in the house, etc, etc. You will have much more information to make an informed choice.
They even sometimes have mixed breeds; most have connections with shelters so that if a dog of their breed comes in, they will get called.
Good luck.
Gen

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By: Susan W. http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/comment-page-1/#comment-19570 Susan W. Mon, 20 Apr 2009 03:35:02 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/#comment-19570 This guy has a lot to say about LGDs (and pigs). http://sugarmtnfarm.com/blog/ Also, friends have an (I think) Great Pyrenees mix on their farm and I have found the barking really annoying. Even if you get used to their barking, any overnight guests you have will likely not sleep well. I'm a cat person myself and I enjoyed your post. Thank you, Susan W. in CO This guy has a lot to say about LGDs (and pigs).
http://sugarmtnfarm.com/blog/

Also, friends have an (I think) Great Pyrenees mix on their farm and I have found the barking really annoying. Even if you get used to their barking, any overnight guests you have will likely not sleep well.

I’m a cat person myself and I enjoyed your post. Thank you,

Susan W. in CO

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By: Lisa http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/comment-page-1/#comment-19547 Lisa Sun, 19 Apr 2009 14:04:56 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/#comment-19547 From both the LGD and family partner standpoint, I most highly recommend an Akbash from the right breeder. As with most great ideas that are even somewhat profitable, the breeding of Akbash dogs has seen much recent unethical behavior. If you want a pup that is an effective LGD and loves/bonds with your family as well, you need to find a breeder for whom both of those attributes are a priority. We are very lucky to work with a small scale local farm that is such. While my husband works with the small dairy herd, our 11 year old daughter has nannied the litter of 11 puppies. Honestly, I cannot say enough positive things about this particular breeding pair and the puppies I have know from them. They have pups now http://www.angelfire.com/members/kaanant/List.html , one of which has already come home with us and is comfortable in both the barn and the house. I especially approve of their questionnaire to match pup to family. You can also check out the Association webpage at http://www.akbashdogsinternational.com/Home/Welcome/tabid/90/Default.aspx The photo of the glorious dog with the little girl draped over him is Khan, the father of the pups at Hidden Springs. Sharon, feel free to privately email me for further details about our experiences with the dogs and with the breeder. Good Luck! Lisa From both the LGD and family partner standpoint, I most highly recommend an Akbash from the right breeder. As with most great ideas that are even somewhat profitable, the breeding of Akbash dogs has seen much recent unethical behavior. If you want a pup that is an effective LGD and loves/bonds with your family as well, you need to find a breeder for whom both of those attributes are a priority.

We are very lucky to work with a small scale local farm that is such. While my husband works with the small dairy herd, our 11 year old daughter has nannied the litter of 11 puppies. Honestly, I cannot say enough positive things about this particular breeding pair and the puppies I have know from them. They have pups now http://www.angelfire.com/members/kaanant/List.html , one of which has already come home with us and is comfortable in both the barn and the house. I especially approve of their questionnaire to match pup to family.

You can also check out the Association webpage at http://www.akbashdogsinternational.com/Home/Welcome/tabid/90/Default.aspx The photo of the glorious dog with the little girl draped over him is Khan, the father of the pups at Hidden Springs. Sharon, feel free to privately email me for further details about our experiences with the dogs and with the breeder. Good Luck!

Lisa

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By: Steph http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/comment-page-1/#comment-19517 Steph Sat, 18 Apr 2009 17:43:39 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/#comment-19517 Sharon, When our elderly Goldens die (one has cancer so it will likely be this year, at least for her), we're going for a Bouvier des Flanders. Yes, she will be expensive but she's to be our farm defense system. We will choose a goofy, happy, playful pup because we want her first loyalty to be to the family & guarding stock and flock as an extension of that duty. If I could find a cross of a golden and a Bouvier or a golden and a Great Pyr we would surely go that route. Steph Sharon,

When our elderly Goldens die (one has cancer so it will likely be this year, at least for her), we’re going for a Bouvier des Flanders. Yes, she will be expensive but she’s to be our farm defense system. We will choose a goofy, happy, playful pup because we want her first loyalty to be to the family & guarding stock and flock as an extension of that duty. If I could find a cross of a golden and a Bouvier or a golden and a Great Pyr we would surely go that route.

Steph

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By: Sharon http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/comment-page-1/#comment-19459 Sharon Fri, 17 Apr 2009 19:50:10 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/#comment-19459 A couple of clarifications- the goats and poultry are right near the house, so it won't really be a matter of either/or in a physical sense. While the field will be part of the dog's territory, the animals required to guard are mostly proximate. We actually have a guard donkey who goes with our shared sheep arrangement (he lives here from May - December) for the sheep. In my research, I've found that LGDs really seem to be able to do three things - live independently with the livestock, bonded to them; live as family pets, primarily bonded to the family; and also live in a dual situation, where they are bonded to both, provided there's sufficient proximity. I've seen enough accounts of that to feel that it is reasonably likely to be successful. Ideally, I think an LGD cross would be perfect - I've got a line on a Old English Sheepdog/Pyr cross that would be nice, if it works out. Eli may yet get his own dog - but that's perhaps for another day. Sharon A couple of clarifications- the goats and poultry are right near the house, so it won’t really be a matter of either/or in a physical sense. While the field will be part of the dog’s territory, the animals required to guard are mostly proximate. We actually have a guard donkey who goes with our shared sheep arrangement (he lives here from May – December) for the sheep.

In my research, I’ve found that LGDs really seem to be able to do three things – live independently with the livestock, bonded to them; live as family pets, primarily bonded to the family; and also live in a dual situation, where they are bonded to both, provided there’s sufficient proximity. I’ve seen enough accounts of that to feel that it is reasonably likely to be successful. Ideally, I think an LGD cross would be perfect – I’ve got a line on a Old English Sheepdog/Pyr cross that would be nice, if it works out.

Eli may yet get his own dog – but that’s perhaps for another day.

Sharon

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By: The old farmer lady http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/comment-page-1/#comment-19453 The old farmer lady Fri, 17 Apr 2009 17:56:13 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/#comment-19453 Ideally, you'd have 2 dogs, as several have pointed out, most LGDs are more into their critters than people. Having said that, I have over the years seen some Pyrs (certainly not all) that have done a credible job of both.....but....as the mother of an autistic son, ("homereared", as someone once put it, and homeschooled) I can tell you that having his own dog was the highlight of his life. Maybe your son could have his own dog, to be his alone?? You might find that worthwhile. My son is now in his 40s and totally independent (if weird :) ); to this day a dog is Number One in his life. If I had both coyotes and bears to contend with in the field, I'd be having a mammoth donkey or a mule. After coyotes outwitted a good dog and got several of my goats, I kept a mule for many years, and once we got him, never had another loss to coyote, bear, or large cat. He was an easy keeper (nothing like getting a horse), smart as a whip, and got a coyote a week for the first several weeks we had him. The neighbors were so thrilled that they banded together and bought his hay and sweet feed after the first year. He also willingly pulled field equipment (I had a 2-acre truck garden) and carts full of carrots, wagons loaded with rocks, whatever. The old farmer lady Ideally, you’d have 2 dogs, as several have pointed out, most LGDs are more into their critters than people. Having said that, I have over the years seen some Pyrs (certainly not all) that have done a credible job of both…..but….as the mother of an autistic son, (”homereared”, as someone once put it, and homeschooled) I can tell you that having his own dog was the highlight of his life. Maybe your son could have his own dog, to be his alone?? You might find that worthwhile. My son is now in his 40s and totally independent (if weird :) ); to this day a dog is Number One in his life.

If I had both coyotes and bears to contend with in the field, I’d be having a mammoth donkey or a mule. After coyotes outwitted a good dog and got several of my goats, I kept a mule for many years, and once we got him, never had another loss to coyote, bear, or large cat. He was an easy keeper (nothing like getting a horse), smart as a whip, and got a coyote a week for the first several weeks we had him. The neighbors were so thrilled that they banded together and bought his hay and sweet feed after the first year. He also willingly pulled field equipment (I had a 2-acre truck garden) and carts full of carrots, wagons loaded with rocks, whatever. The old farmer lady

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By: Linda S http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/comment-page-1/#comment-19445 Linda S Fri, 17 Apr 2009 15:46:49 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/#comment-19445 Sharon, I realize you're asking about a working dog at present, but when you get to the family dog, you might reconsider the corgi. I had a friend who spent over a year researching dogs before she bought one for her kids, and she went with corgi. Sharon, I realize you’re asking about a working dog at present, but when you get to the family dog, you might reconsider the corgi. I had a friend who spent over a year researching dogs before she bought one for her kids, and she went with corgi.

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By: EJ http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/comment-page-1/#comment-19441 EJ Fri, 17 Apr 2009 14:54:39 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/#comment-19441 Maybe you should look into other guardian animals - gesee, donkeys, llamas? Dogs are cute but may not be the answer. We have a guardian llama (now 5 yrs old) who has kept the coyotes and other predators away for a year. We decided not to get a LGD because of issues with bonding and working. A LGD needs to be with the livestock more or less all the time and not be strongly bonded with people. We already have a dog in the house and it would be hard for us not to bond with a puppy. The puppy needs protection the first year or so and won't begin guarding until its grown. The large breeds often don't live that long, 6-7 years. Another aspect of LGD is that it you get a puppy it might not work out as a guardian dog and then you have a dog thats too wild for the house, but not good at guarding. We also liked the llama because he eats hay and grass like the sheep. he is hard to catch, tho. Maybe you should look into other guardian animals – gesee, donkeys, llamas? Dogs are cute but may not be the answer.

We have a guardian llama (now 5 yrs old) who has kept the coyotes and other predators away for a year. We decided not to get a LGD because of issues with bonding and working. A LGD needs to be with the livestock more or less all the time and not be strongly bonded with people. We already have a dog in the house and it would be hard for us not to bond with a puppy. The puppy needs protection the first year or so and won’t begin guarding until its grown. The large breeds often don’t live that long, 6-7 years.

Another aspect of LGD is that it you get a puppy it might not work out as a guardian dog and then you have a dog thats too wild for the house, but not good at guarding. We also liked the llama because he eats hay and grass like the sheep. he is hard to catch, tho.

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By: Catholic Agrarian http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/comment-page-1/#comment-19435 Catholic Agrarian Fri, 17 Apr 2009 13:11:11 +0000 http://sharonastyk.com/2009/04/16/the-dog-search/#comment-19435 We've had both Pyrenees and Anatolians and have settled on Anatolians for the dogs we keep. They seem to be a little more serious about their work, and they don't get the natty dreadlocks Pyrenees do. We’ve had both Pyrenees and Anatolians and have settled on Anatolians for the dogs we keep. They seem to be a little more serious about their work, and they don’t get the natty dreadlocks Pyrenees do.

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