Warning: Giant (Fun) Timesuck Ahead

Sharon December 12th, 2008

http://www.foodtimeline.org/

 Must. Finish. Book.  Must. Not. Look.

On the other hand, maybe some of you have time to kill.  Enjoy!

 Sharon

7 Responses to “Warning: Giant (Fun) Timesuck Ahead”

  1. Susan in NJon 12 Dec 2008 at 2:11 pm

    Wow, not that I have time to kill right now, but I can’t wait until I do! Thanks for the link.

  2. Sarahon 12 Dec 2008 at 2:59 pm

    Woww…and that word says “loquats”, doesn’t it? Not locusts. Darn. I was all hoping for an entertaining fried-grasshopper recipe.

    If anyone else wants food-related internet time to kill and likes words, there’s also http://www.freerice.org

  3. EJ Hurston 12 Dec 2008 at 4:57 pm

    That’s right Sharon. You go girl!

  4. Rebeccaon 12 Dec 2008 at 6:59 pm

    Wow. Vodka penne was invented the year I was born. I am definitely going to have to try that now. ;-)

  5. Adamon 12 Dec 2008 at 7:17 pm

    Very interesting website - thanks for posting!

    Also, am I the only one shocked to see that this decades contribution to the food timeline included two fried beverages? How is that even possible?

  6. Leila Abu-Sabaon 13 Dec 2008 at 1:19 am

    This seems related to culinary history thread: SF Chronicle article about the history of wheat in the Bay ARea. Yes, people used to grow wheat in Alameda County and down the valley to San Jose.

    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/12/10/FDA714I6QO.DTL&type=food

    One small organic farmer is trying it again, and there’s a researcher who is working with old heirloom varieties to see what does well in this climate. They say a soft wheat works best. I have a book about “Californio” cooking of the Bay Area - cuisine of the Hispanic/Mexican folk of California pre-1849. They ate flour tortillas, not corn, and I’m wondering if the soft wheat was better for flatbreads.

    BTW the book is California Rancho Cooking by Jacqueline Higuera McMahan. I found it at the library first; ordered it online; and then saw it for sale in a State Park gift shop in Mission San Juan Bautista (45 miles south of S. Jose). Really lovely recipes and reading, gives a fascinating food history of California before the arrival of Anglos.

    The sacred trinity of Californios according to McMahan: the olive, the fig and the chile. Yum, huh?

  7. Greenpaon 13 Dec 2008 at 10:08 am

    China? What China?

    Yike. fun- and loads of details; but the foods I’m most familiar with also have tremendous numbers of untruths in their history-mostly the common ones stemming from a regional author with vast local experience- but none from 1,000 miles away.

    Still- learned some useful stuff, of course.

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